ANCIENT ART

Aug 23

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Aug 22

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Aug 21

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Aug 20

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Aug 19

A silver-gilded greave dating to the mid-4th century BCE from the Yambol region of Bulgaria.

Only recently rediscovered in 2005, this greave was part of a set of grave goods found in an Odrysian aristocrat’s grave in Golyamata Mogila tumulus. This greave appears to have been for the left leg.
Artefact courtesy of & currently located at the National History Museum, Sofia, Bulgaria. Photo taken by vintagedept.

A silver-gilded greave dating to the mid-4th century BCE from the Yambol region of Bulgaria.

Only recently rediscovered in 2005, this greave was part of a set of grave goods found in an Odrysian aristocrat’s grave in Golyamata Mogila tumulus. This greave appears to have been for the left leg.

Artefact courtesy of & currently located at the National History Museum, Sofia, Bulgaria. Photo taken by vintagedept.

Aug 18

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Aug 17

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Aug 16

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Aug 15

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Aug 14

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Aug 13

Delphi Tholos, Greece. The tholos was created approximately 380-360 BC within the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia.
Photo taken by Kufoleto.

Delphi Tholos, Greece. The tholos was created approximately 380-360 BC within the sanctuary of Athena Pronaia.

Photo taken by Kufoleto.

Aug 12

One very fancy ancient spoon. 
Intended to be used for ointment, this Egyptian spoon with a pivoting lid is made of ivory and dates to ca. 1336-1327 BCE.

The late Eighteenth Dynasty was one of the the most flamboyant and excessive periods of design in Egyptian history. This spoon demonstrates the dominant aesthetic of the day: the complementary union of naturalistic elements, formal design, and excessive, stylized detailing.
The motif is a pomegranate branch terminating in a huge reddish-yellow fruit that swivels on a tiny pivot to reveal the bowl of the spoon. Tiny pomegranates, brightly painted flowers, and slender leaves project from the stem that serves as the handle. Beneath the lowest leaves the artisan has added an extraordinary embellishment: two lotus flowers, each with a Mimispos fruit emerging from it.
Although the individual elements of the spoon are treated with painstaking attention to detail, the design itself is pure fantasy. For example, pomegranate flowers and fruit never appear on a tree at the same time. (-Brooklyn Museum)

Courtesy of & currently located at the Brooklyn Museum, via their online collections, 42.411.

One very fancy ancient spoon. 

Intended to be used for ointment, this Egyptian spoon with a pivoting lid is made of ivory and dates to ca. 1336-1327 BCE.

The late Eighteenth Dynasty was one of the the most flamboyant and excessive periods of design in Egyptian history. This spoon demonstrates the dominant aesthetic of the day: the complementary union of naturalistic elements, formal design, and excessive, stylized detailing.

The motif is a pomegranate branch terminating in a huge reddish-yellow fruit that swivels on a tiny pivot to reveal the bowl of the spoon. Tiny pomegranates, brightly painted flowers, and slender leaves project from the stem that serves as the handle. Beneath the lowest leaves the artisan has added an extraordinary embellishment: two lotus flowers, each with a Mimispos fruit emerging from it.

Although the individual elements of the spoon are treated with painstaking attention to detail, the design itself is pure fantasy. For example, pomegranate flowers and fruit never appear on a tree at the same time. (-Brooklyn Museum)

Courtesy of & currently located at the Brooklyn Museum, via their online collections42.411.

Aug 11

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Aug 10

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Aug 09

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