ANCIENT ART

Sep 02

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Sep 01

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Aug 31

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Aug 30

thegetty:

Did humans have eyes that close together in ancient times?
Naaaah, this helmet is ceremonial, most like for a funerary purpose. Once adorned with horsehair, feathers or metal animal horns, this decorative helmet was certainly not functional.
Did you notice the engraved ringlet curls at the helmet’s ‘hairline’?
Helmet, 400 - 375 B.C., Greek. J. Paul Getty Museum.

thegetty:

Did humans have eyes that close together in ancient times?

Naaaah, this helmet is ceremonial, most like for a funerary purpose. Once adorned with horsehair, feathers or metal animal horns, this decorative helmet was certainly not functional.

Did you notice the engraved ringlet curls at the helmet’s ‘hairline’?

Helmet, 400 - 375 B.C., Greek. J. Paul Getty Museum.

Aug 29

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Aug 28

Egyptian relief of mourning men.
This limestone relief dates to ca. 1352-1336 B.C.E., and is from Saqqara, Egypt.

This relief fragment shows two men, on the right, who make the gestures of mourners. The small cuts in the stone surface above and in front of the figures represent the dust that mourning Egyptians poured on their heads as a sign of bereavement. To the left can be seen the traces of a man in official dress who appears to be hurrying from the opened door of the tomb. Unlike many of the objects in this gallery, the scene suggests distress in the presence of death.

Courtesy of & currently located at the Brooklyn Museum, USA, via their online collections: 69.114. +If you’re interested in learning more about mourning in ancient Egypt, check out this post I did a while ago on the matter.

Egyptian relief of mourning men.

This limestone relief dates to ca. 1352-1336 B.C.E., and is from Saqqara, Egypt.

This relief fragment shows two men, on the right, who make the gestures of mourners. The small cuts in the stone surface above and in front of the figures represent the dust that mourning Egyptians poured on their heads as a sign of bereavement. To the left can be seen the traces of a man in official dress who appears to be hurrying from the opened door of the tomb. Unlike many of the objects in this gallery, the scene suggests distress in the presence of death.

Courtesy of & currently located at the Brooklyn Museum, USA, via their online collections69.114. +If you’re interested in learning more about mourning in ancient Egypt, check out this post I did a while ago on the matter.

Aug 27

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Aug 26

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Aug 25

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Aug 24

Here is one of the earliest known reliefs to commemorate the legitimate marriages of former Roman slaves. 
The Funerary Stele of Aurelius Hermia and his wife Aurelia Philematium is from the tomb on Via Nomentana, and dates to ca. 80 BCE.
The British Museum provides the following prose translation of the funerary stele:
"Aurelius Hermia, freedman of Lucius, butcher by trade from the Viminal Hill. My partner who departed this life before me was pure of body and loving of spirit. She was the only one for me, and lived her life faithful to her faithful husband, with equal devotion. She never failed in her duties through self-interest or greed. Aurelia, freedwoman of Lucius.
Aurelia Philematio, freedwoman of Lucius. In life, I was given the name Aurelia Philematium (little Kiss) and led a chaste, modest and sheltered life, faithful to my husband. Aurelius, my husband, whom I now sadly miss, was a fellow freedman. He was, in fact, much more to me than even a parent. He took me into his care at the age of seven. Now at the age of forty, I fall into the hands of death. He flourished in the eyes of others due to my constant and close support.”
Courtesy of & currently located at The British Museum, London, 1867,0508.55. Photo taken by Sebastià Giralt.

Here is one of the earliest known reliefs to commemorate the legitimate marriages of former Roman slaves. 

The Funerary Stele of Aurelius Hermia and his wife Aurelia Philematium is from the tomb on Via Nomentana, and dates to ca. 80 BCE.

The British Museum provides the following prose translation of the funerary stele:

"Aurelius Hermia, freedman of Lucius, butcher by trade from the Viminal Hill. My partner who departed this life before me was pure of body and loving of spirit. She was the only one for me, and lived her life faithful to her faithful husband, with equal devotion. She never failed in her duties through self-interest or greed. Aurelia, freedwoman of Lucius.

Aurelia Philematio, freedwoman of Lucius. In life, I was given the name Aurelia Philematium (little Kiss) and led a chaste, modest and sheltered life, faithful to my husband. Aurelius, my husband, whom I now sadly miss, was a fellow freedman. He was, in fact, much more to me than even a parent. He took me into his care at the age of seven. Now at the age of forty, I fall into the hands of death. He flourished in the eyes of others due to my constant and close support.”

Courtesy of & currently located at The British Museum, London, 1867,0508.55. Photo taken by Sebastià Giralt.

Aug 23

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Aug 22

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Aug 21

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Aug 20

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Aug 19

A silver-gilded greave dating to the mid-4th century BCE from the Yambol region of Bulgaria.

Only recently rediscovered in 2005, this greave was part of a set of grave goods found in an Odrysian aristocrat’s grave in Golyamata Mogila tumulus. This greave appears to have been for the left leg.
Artefact courtesy of & currently located at the National History Museum, Sofia, Bulgaria. Photo taken by vintagedept.

A silver-gilded greave dating to the mid-4th century BCE from the Yambol region of Bulgaria.

Only recently rediscovered in 2005, this greave was part of a set of grave goods found in an Odrysian aristocrat’s grave in Golyamata Mogila tumulus. This greave appears to have been for the left leg.

Artefact courtesy of & currently located at the National History Museum, Sofia, Bulgaria. Photo taken by vintagedept.