The Tomb of Daniel, what is thought to be the traditional burial place of the biblical prophet Daniel. Though various locations have been named for the site, this tomb in Susa, Iran is the most widely accepted.
Though the Book of Daniel never specifies the location in which he died, it does mention that Daniel lived in Babylon and may have visited the place of Susa, Iran. It was first mentioned to be the burial place of Daniel by Benjamin of Tudela, who visited Asia between 1160 and 1163.
Muslim traditions agree in stating that Daniel was buried at Susa, and a similar tradition was current among the Syriac writers. 9th century Persian historian Al-Baladhuri states that when the conqueror Abu Musa al-Ash’ari came to Susa in 638, he found the coffin of Daniel which had been brought from Babylon in the hope of bringing rain in a period of bring draught. This matter was referred to the calif Umar, who ordered the coffin to be buried, which was done so by sinking it to the bottom of a  nearby stream.
A similar account is given by 10th century Arab chronicler Ibn Hawqal who writes:

"In the city of Susa there is a river and I have heard that in the time of Abu Mousa Al Ashoari a coffin was found there; it is said to contain the bones of Daniel the Prophet. The people held it in great veneration and in times of distress, famine or droughts brought it out and prayed for rain. Abu Mousa Al Ashoari ordered that the coffin be encased with three coverings and submerged it in the river so that it could not be viewed. The grave can be seen by anyone who dives to the bottom of the water".

William Ouseley in Walpole’s Memoirs of the East described the Tomb of Daniel in Susa as being situated in:

"a most beautiful spot, washed by a clear running stream and shaded by planes and other trees of ample foliage. The building is of Mahomedan date and is inhabited by a solitary Dervish, who shows the spot where the prophet is buried beneath, a small and simple square brick mausoleum, said to be (without probability) coeval with his death. It has, however, neither date nor inscription to prove the truth or falsehood of the Dervish’s assertion. The small river running at the foot of this building, which is called the Bellerau, it has been said flows immediately over the prophets Tomb, and from the transparency of the water, his coffin was to be seen at the bottom; but the Dervish and the natives whom I questioned remembered no tradition corroborating such a fact; on the contrary; it has at all times been customary with the people of the country to resort hither on certain days of the months, when they offer up their prayers at the tomb I have mentioned, in supplication to the prophet’s shade."

The photograph shows the cone-like shaped roof of the tomb. This short youtube video summarizes well the appearance of the tomb, inside and out.
Photo courtesy & taken by ninara

The Tomb of Daniel, what is thought to be the traditional burial place of the biblical prophet Daniel. Though various locations have been named for the site, this tomb in Susa, Iran is the most widely accepted.

Though the Book of Daniel never specifies the location in which he died, it does mention that Daniel lived in Babylon and may have visited the place of Susa, Iran. It was first mentioned to be the burial place of Daniel by Benjamin of Tudela, who visited Asia between 1160 and 1163.

Muslim traditions agree in stating that Daniel was buried at Susa, and a similar tradition was current among the Syriac writers. 9th century Persian historian Al-Baladhuri states that when the conqueror Abu Musa al-Ash’ari came to Susa in 638, he found the coffin of Daniel which had been brought from Babylon in the hope of bringing rain in a period of bring draught. This matter was referred to the calif Umar, who ordered the coffin to be buried, which was done so by sinking it to the bottom of a  nearby stream.

A similar account is given by 10th century Arab chronicler Ibn Hawqal who writes:

"In the city of Susa there is a river and I have heard that in the time of Abu Mousa Al Ashoari a coffin was found there; it is said to contain the bones of Daniel the Prophet. The people held it in great veneration and in times of distress, famine or droughts brought it out and prayed for rain. Abu Mousa Al Ashoari ordered that the coffin be encased with three coverings and submerged it in the river so that it could not be viewed. The grave can be seen by anyone who dives to the bottom of the water".

William Ouseley in Walpole’s Memoirs of the East described the Tomb of Daniel in Susa as being situated in:

"a most beautiful spot, washed by a clear running stream and shaded by planes and other trees of ample foliage. The building is of Mahomedan date and is inhabited by a solitary Dervish, who shows the spot where the prophet is buried beneath, a small and simple square brick mausoleum, said to be (without probability) coeval with his death. It has, however, neither date nor inscription to prove the truth or falsehood of the Dervish’s assertion. The small river running at the foot of this building, which is called the Bellerau, it has been said flows immediately over the prophets Tomb, and from the transparency of the water, his coffin was to be seen at the bottom; but the Dervish and the natives whom I questioned remembered no tradition corroborating such a fact; on the contrary; it has at all times been customary with the people of the country to resort hither on certain days of the months, when they offer up their prayers at the tomb I have mentioned, in supplication to the prophet’s shade."

The photograph shows the cone-like shaped roof of the tomb. This short youtube video summarizes well the appearance of the tomb, inside and out.

Photo courtesy & taken by ninara

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