Figurine of a woman playing a hand-drum, painted terracotta, 8th-7th centuries B.C.E.

The Bible preserves an extensive and well-developed musical vocabulary. Even though precise meanings are sometimes elusive, it is abundantly clear that singing, dancing and playing instruments figured prominently in Temple worship. Musicians, both male and female, were held in high regard.
Terracottas of female drum players and other figurines depicting musicians, both male and female, have been found in Judah and Israel, as well as Phoenicia and Cyprus. Hand-drums, in particular, were associated with women, both among the figures and in the biblical record, indicating that women customarily played this instrument. Female drummers not only provided rhythms for singing and dancing at family and community celebrations, but, as Psalm 68 makes evident, their music was also incorporated into the ceremonies of the Temple.
"Your processions are seen, O God, the processions of my God, my King, into the sanctuary -singers in front, musicians behind, between them young women playing hand-drums." -Psalm 68:25-26 (Eng. Trans. 68:24-25).
(Text: Semitic Museum).

Courtesy & currently located at the Semitic Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. Photo taken by B.Kelly.

Figurine of a woman playing a hand-drum, painted terracotta, 8th-7th centuries B.C.E.

The Bible preserves an extensive and well-developed musical vocabulary. Even though precise meanings are sometimes elusive, it is abundantly clear that singing, dancing and playing instruments figured prominently in Temple worship. Musicians, both male and female, were held in high regard.

Terracottas of female drum players and other figurines depicting musicians, both male and female, have been found in Judah and Israel, as well as Phoenicia and Cyprus. Hand-drums, in particular, were associated with women, both among the figures and in the biblical record, indicating that women customarily played this instrument. Female drummers not only provided rhythms for singing and dancing at family and community celebrations, but, as Psalm 68 makes evident, their music was also incorporated into the ceremonies of the Temple.

"Your processions are seen, O God, the processions of my God, my King, into the sanctuary -singers in front, musicians behind, between them young women playing hand-drums." -Psalm 68:25-26 (Eng. Trans. 68:24-25).

(Text: Semitic Museum).

Courtesy & currently located at the Semitic Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. Photo taken by B.Kelly.

  1. plio-cavedeposits reblogged this from semiticmuseum
  2. cutefangs reblogged this from ancientart and added:
    Check out this huge cock at a museum.
  3. lord--thoth reblogged this from ancientart
  4. arthistoryfashionme reblogged this from ancientart and added:
    Figurine of a woman playing a hand-drum, painted terracotta, 8th-7th centuries B.C.E. The Bible preserves an extensive...
  5. vriskatwerkkit reblogged this from ancientart
  6. telesilla reblogged this from ancientart
  7. mjolnirmaleficarum reblogged this from ancientart
  8. clodia-metelli reblogged this from ancientart
  9. viagens-no-tempo reblogged this from ancientart
  10. pallas-athena reblogged this from ancientart
  11. historisch reblogged this from ancientart
  12. ladykrampus reblogged this from ancientart
  13. nangoat reblogged this from ancientart
  14. semiticmuseum reblogged this from ancientart
  15. loyaltyequalsfrustration reblogged this from ancientart
  16. jeremylawson reblogged this from greybeard55
  17. meisterj reblogged this from ancientart
  18. full-force-forward reblogged this from ancientart
  19. heylookitsjas reblogged this from ancientart
  20. sonofgloin reblogged this from ancientart
  21. mindquirk reblogged this from ancientart
  22. smart-glasses reblogged this from ancientart