What exactly is this person doing?

The scene represents a bloodletting ritual performed by the king of Yaxchilán, Shield Jaguar the Great (681-742), and his wife, Lady K’ab’al Xook (Itzamnaaj Bahlen III). The king holds a flaming torch over his wife, who is pulling a thorny rope through her tongue. Scrolls of blood can be seen around her mouth. (x)

Bloodletting was an essential part of being Maya royalty. This formidable ordeal mirrors the sacrifice involved in the Mayan story of creation, where the gods let their blood to create humans. The pierced tongue of Lady Xook enables her blood to flow as part of a ritual communication with spirits and gods.

By choosing to take part in the ritual, the queen demonstrated both her moral and physical strength to the people, and her suitability as a Maya royal. (x)

This particular limestone lintel (which you can see the full image of here) is considered one of the masterpieces of Maya art, and was originally one of a series of three panels at Yaxchilán.
Courtesy & currently located at the British Museum, London. Photo taken by KateMonkey.

What exactly is this person doing?

The scene represents a bloodletting ritual performed by the king of Yaxchilán, Shield Jaguar the Great (681-742), and his wife, Lady K’ab’al Xook (Itzamnaaj Bahlen III). The king holds a flaming torch over his wife, who is pulling a thorny rope through her tongue. Scrolls of blood can be seen around her mouth. (x)

Bloodletting was an essential part of being Maya royalty. This formidable ordeal mirrors the sacrifice involved in the Mayan story of creation, where the gods let their blood to create humans. The pierced tongue of Lady Xook enables her blood to flow as part of a ritual communication with spirits and gods.

By choosing to take part in the ritual, the queen demonstrated both her moral and physical strength to the people, and her suitability as a Maya royal. (x)

This particular limestone lintel (which you can see the full image of here) is considered one of the masterpieces of Maya art, and was originally one of a series of three panels at Yaxchilán.

Courtesy & currently located at the British Museum, London. Photo taken by KateMonkey.

  1. sylveonslove reblogged this from dropout-ronin
  2. dropout-ronin reblogged this from ancientart
  3. seaweedmorgue reblogged this from ancientart
  4. ozilot reblogged this from ancientart
  5. nkisiconcorde-artdocumentary reblogged this from rbor
  6. spadezking reblogged this from kv96ic28
  7. kv96ic28 reblogged this from veganbutt
  8. splackk reblogged this from ancientart
  9. clodia-metelli reblogged this from ancientart
  10. lucidknowledge reblogged this from ancientart
  11. afgans reblogged this from ancientart
  12. medusaspajamas reblogged this from ancientart
  13. slimgrape reblogged this from ancientart
  14. ladykrampus reblogged this from ancientart
  15. catyuy reblogged this from flamingmuse
  16. peanutuntouchablemcthugzilla reblogged this from ancientart
  17. itisntbasedincardiff reblogged this from ancientart
  18. justusunicorns reblogged this from flamingmuse
  19. flamingmuse reblogged this from ancientart
  20. katterrena reblogged this from cabinet-de-curiosites
  21. cabinet-de-curiosites reblogged this from ancientart
  22. theskylarkin reblogged this from ancientart
  23. osomatorio reblogged this from ancientart
  24. manicpixienightmarecunt reblogged this from ancientart
  25. spireofkhufu reblogged this from ancientart
  26. postscriptforfinales reblogged this from ancientart